Data Warehouse: On-Premises or Cloud?

I’ve been fielding this question a lot these days: “We’re building a data warehouse – should we build it here or in the cloud?” It’s a fair question, but it’s not the question that should be asked. The more appropriate question is this: “What part of our data warehouse solution should be in the cloud, and how does it work together with our on-premises data?”

Data Warehouse: On-Premises or Cloud?I shared a few of my thoughts on this topic a few weeks ago in a podcast interview with Carlos Chacon, when we discussed whether or not the on-premises data warehouse was dead. Without spoiling all of the details of that conversation, my short answer is that the on-premises data warehouse is alive and well but is no longer the only DW option.

As recently as three years ago, the cloud was still relatively new and not yet widely in use in most organizations. At the same time, companies selling cloud services were in the midst of a massive marketing effort to direct customers to the cloud. Microsoft famously declared themselves to be all-in on cloud well before the market was ready to follow. Many IT leaders and technologists bristled at the thought of being forced into the cloud at the expense of tried-and-true on-premises solutions.

However, in the past couple of years the message from cloud providers has softened. No more is it “cloud or bust”. Rather, cloud services companies – and Microsoft in particular – have reshaped the message to one in which the cloud is just one piece of a heterogeneous architecture that may include on-prem, PaaS, IaaS, and SaaS solutions. At the same time, consumers are realizing the value of cloud-based solutions for some of their architecture. Although I rarely have a client that wants to build an all-cloud infrastructure, most everyone I work with is at least exploring if not actively using cloud services for a portion of their data systems.

Cloud services are here to stay. No, the cloud absolutely will not take over on-premises data storage and processing. Rather, cloud offerings will be one more option for managing data and the code around it. So the question is not whether you should be in the cloud – the answer is yes (or it soon will be). The more practical question is how to best leverage cloud services as part of a hybrid strategy to minimize development time and total cost of ownership.

 

This post originally appeared in the Data Geek Newsletter.

Introducing the Pinch Hit Service

I am happy to announce the launch of a new service designed to help with very short term consultation needs. Although most consulting engagements are weeks or months in duration, we’ve discovered that some client needs are simple and do not require a traditional consulting approach. In response to this need, Tyleris has created the Pinch Hit service as a simple, no-commitment, 2-hour remote consultation.

The Pinch Hit was created to assist clients who are handling their own data warehousing, ETL, and reporting infrastructure. They may be looking for a second set of eyes to look at a problem, assistance with troubleshooting a specific problem, or a focused training session. Much like the use of a pinch hitter in baseball, Tyleris brings a specialized skillset to help deal with a clutch situation.

Not every business or technical need is suitable for this service, but in cases where the problem domain is narrow, the Pinch Hit can deliver outstanding value in a short time. If you find yourself in need of a Pinch Hit engagement from Tyleris, just let us know how we can help.

Request a Pinch Hit

 

 

 

SSIS Training for Spring 2016

If you are looking for SSIS classroom training, we’ve got several exciting opportunities for you this spring and summer! Tim Mitchell will be delivering full-day introductory and intermediate-level presentations in Baltimore, Orlando, and Baton Rouge later this year.

Saturday, April 16th in Orlando, FL: Introduction to SSIS

Friday, April 22nd in Orlando, Fl: Building Better SSIS Packages

Friday, April 29th in Baltimore, MD: Building Better SSIS Packages

Friday, August 5th in Baton Rouge, LA: Building Better SSIS Packages

Each of these events is open now for registration; you can participate by following any of the links above. As always, contact us with any questions.

SSIS Classroom Training – Boston and Denver

For those looking for classroom training in SSIS, I’ve got an exciting announcement: I have a brand new course entitled “Building Better SSIS Packages” which I’ll be delivering in Denver and Boston this fall. Here’s a brief into to this course:

There’s nothing magical about building rock-solid SSIS packages, but it does take some discipline, experience, and a library of best practices. That is exactly the aim of this course: to demonstrate a set of proven practices that help frame the development of enterprise-ready SSIS packages.

In this full-day presentation, we will walk through each of these five facets of well-built packages, discussing and then demonstrating ways of applying these practices to design better SSIS packages.

I’ll be teaching this course in Denver, Colorado on Friday, September 18th, and again in Boston, Massachusetts on Friday, October 16th. Registration is open for both courses.

Presenting at SQL Saturday in Richmond, VA

This weekend I’ll be traveling to Richmond, Virginia to present at SQL Saturday.  On Friday, March 20th, I will present a full-day session entitled “Real World SSIS: A Survival Guide.” On Saturday, I will share some data cleansing tips in a one-hour session entitled “Dealing with Dirty Data with SQL Server and SSIS.

Registration for the SQL Saturday event is still open. There is still some space available for my full-day session on Friday, but it’s filling up quickly.

Advanced SSIS Training in Dallas

I’m very excited to offer a new course entitled “Advanced SSIS” in the Dallas area this spring. My friend and fellow ETL architect Andy Leonard and I will be delivering this new 3-day course March 9-11, 2015 at the Microsoft offices in Irving, Texas. This course is intended for those who have experience using Integration Services who are looking to take their skills to the next level. In this course, we’ll each be sharing experiences and war stories from 10+ years in the data integration space.

Among the topics we’ll cover:

  • Data flow internals
  • Performance design patterns
  • Learning how to fail properly
  • Security in SSIS
  • Deployment design patterns
  • Data quality
  • Metadata management patterns
  • Biml
  • Known limitations of SSIS, and workarounds for them
  • ETL data edge cases

We’ll bring the coffee and lunch for all three days. All you need to bring is your experience using SSIS and your readiness to advance your data integration skills.  Space is still available, and early bird pricing is in effect until February 6th. If you’ve got a team of folks who would benefit from this training, contact me about a group discount. If you’re coming in from out of town, there are lots of hotels close by, including the NYLO right next door and the Hampton Inn about a mile away.

Feel free to contact me with any questions. We hope to see you there!